Visit for donated technology for nonprofits and libraries!

Does your library offer technology assistance to older adults? Do you teach computer classes for seniors? Are patrons bringing in tablets and other devices that have been given to them by grandchildren? Recent research from the Pew Institute shows that only 59% of older adults go online. New technologies can be difficult to learn, and older adults may not understand the benefits of using technology. But libraries can help older adults adopt technology in meaningful ways for communication, lifelong learning, and entertainment.

Join us for this free webinar to learn how your library can help older adults learn to use new technologies. You will hear from the St. Mary’s County Library (Maryland), which is providing older adults with effective training and technology assistance. This library will share examples of successful programming, as well as tips for working with older adults. You will also learn about TechBoomers, a free website that offers technology training tutorials developed specifically for older adults. Come hear examples of how this site is being used by libraries to supplement programs and services, and to help increase staff’s confidence in being able to help patrons.

In this talk, Prof. Iiyoshi goes head to head with an AI questioning the fate of education and lifelong learning!

Toru Iiyoshi was previously a senior scholar and Director of the Knowledge Media Laboratory at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (1999-2008), and Senior Strategist in the Office of Educational Innovation and Technology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2009-2011). He is the co-editor of the Carnegie Foundation book, “Opening Up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge” (MIT Press, 2008) and co-author of three books including “The Art of Multimedia: Design and Development of The Multimedia Human Body” and numerous academic and commercial articles. He received the Outstanding Practice Award in Instructional Development and the Robert M. Gagne Award for Research in Instructional Design from the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Currently, he is the director and a professor of the Center for the Promotion of Excellence in Higher Education (CPEHE) at Kyoto University.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at